Currently browsing the "Israeli" category.

Review: Tel Aviv on Fire

You might not think that there’s much humor to be found in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. But Palestinian director Sameh Zoabi has crafted a very amiable farce that spans the borders and steps lightly around the conflicts. In Tel Aviv on Fire, Palestinian bumbler Salam (Kais Nashif) falls into a writing job on a very popular Palestinian soap opera. But he soon finds his freedom depends on the story going the way a certain Israeli Defense Force officer (Yaniv Biton) at the border crossing wants it to. Meanwhile Salam is also wooing an old flame and dealing with the diva antics of the soap’s French lead. And as he’s running around trying to please everyone, the show must go on.

Quickie Review: Working Woman

This Israeli #MeToo drama centers on Orna (Liron Ben-Shlush) whose husband’s new Tel Aviv restaurant is struggling to get off the ground, so she takes a job with real estate developer Benny (Menashe Noy) who she knew from her time in the army. At first everything is great. She’s given a lot of responsibility and finds she’s really good at what she’s doing, but then come the unwanted and inappropriate advances and she’s not sure how to react, but hopes they’ll stop once she says no. They don’t. Working Woman is a story that will be familiar to many women. Orna wants the job. She’s given well-deserved promotions and people treat her with respect for the great job she’s doing. But the boss thinks he has the right to treat her however he wants. He knows she’s happily married and has kids at home. He’s married too, and she’s met his wife, but still.

Review: Foxtrot

This moving Israeli drama begins with a scene every parent with a child in the army fears — the knock at the door and the soldiers with solemn faces. They don’t even have to hear the words to know their world has been changed forever. When Daphna (Sarah Adler) and Michael (Lior Ashkenazi) Feldmann are informed of the death of their son Jonathan, she is immediately sedated by the soldiers and put to bed, as Michael is forced to deal with the funeral arrangements and a slew of other people’s emotional needs, while still numb and unable to find out what exactly happened to his child.

The Women’s Balcony Review

Right now is a great time for Israeli cinema. In the past month I’ve seen The Wedding Plan and Past Life, and now comes The Women’s Balcony. (And Wonder Woman Gal Gadot is an Israeli, too.) And what do they all have in common, besides speaking Hebrew? They’re all about strong women. And they’re all worth seeing.

Past Life Review

Set in Jerusalem in 1977 and based on a true story, Past Life is a tangle of secrets. Safe in Israel after escaping the Nazis during World War II, Dr. Baruch Milch (Doron Tavori) has raised a family and is a successful gynecologist. But when his youngest daughter Sephi (Joy Rieger) is invited to Berlin to sing at a concert, his peaceful life is turned upside down. A Polish woman (Katarzyna Gniewkowska) accosts her and tells her that her father is a murderer. Back at home, she doesn’t immediately tell him about the experience, but she does tell her older sister Nana (Nelly Tagar) who’s a liberal journalist and who is determined to get to the truth of the story. The sisters have never really talked with their Holocaust survivor parents about their wartime experiences, and their sudden interest uncovers painful and sad memories and exposes the sisters’ unspoken emotions regarding their father. And throughout the girls’ investigation, you have no idea which way it’s going to go, but you can feel that Sephi is truly afraid of what she’ll find.

The Wedding Plan

In this fun little chick flick from Israel, Michal (Noa Kooler) is finally getting married. She has the fiancĂ©, the wedding hall, and has invitations ready to go out for the big day. But just when it seems she’s destined to become a married woman, her groom decides he doesn’t really love her. Devastated, she heads to a matchmaker and starts dating a series of men, thinking that one of them must be her intended. And she doesn’t cancel her plans to get married on the eighth night of Hanukkah, so she has a month to find Mr. Right. Being an Orthodox Jew, she puts it in God’s hands to find her a husband by the day of the wedding. Of course, everyone thinks she is totally nuts!