Currently browsing the "Chris O’Dowd" tag.

Review: How to Build a Girl

In this engaging coming-of-age flick, Johanna Morrigan (Beanie Feldstein – Booksmart, Ladybird) is a nerdy teenager living on a council estate in Wolverhampton, England in 1993. Her Dad’s a ne’er-do-well aging rocker. Her Mom’s suffering from post-partum depression after the birth of twins boys. And Johanna just wants to get away from them all. So when one of her other brothers shows her an ad for a writing job at a rock and roll magazine, she sends a sample article. She knows nothing about rock music, but she can write and what does she have to lose?

Review: Juliet, Naked

Ah, what a breath of fresh air! Juliet, Naked is a charming and funny romantic drama that is pure and simple in its development of characters and story. In lesser hands, it might have felt like a Hallmark or Lifetime ‘second chance’ romance. But Juliet, Naked benefits from the talent and affability of its three lead actors – Rose Byrne, Chris O’Dowd and Ethan Hawke. The screenplay is adapted from a novel by Nick Hornby (Brooklyn, About a Boy, Fever Pitch, High Fidelity) whose writing style lends itself well to the genre. There aren’t any real villains here; just humans wrestling with past regrets and coming to terms with who they are and who they want to be.

Review: Molly’s Game

Molly’s Game is based on the true story of Molly Bloom, a competitive freestyle skier who famously blew her Olympics chance and then rose to the pinnacle of the high stakes poker world running the most exclusive games in the country. The film is writer extraordinaire Aaron Sorkin’s (West Wing, The Social Network) directorial debut. And it’s intense. Jessica Chastain is outstanding as Molly. She’s smart and driven and living large. And Idris Elba is very easy on the eyes as Charlie Jaffey, the high-powered lawyer she hires to save her when it all comes crashing down and the FBI comes after her.

St. Vincent

St. Vincent is a surprisingly feel good flick, and a great deal of that is due the performance of Bill Murray, who has followed his early comedy career with some wonderful dramatic turns. He is fortunate to have teamed up with a very talented newby writer/director who crafted a layered character for him to sink his teeth into. But the film also has what could have been a pretty cliched story at its center that is slowly turned on its head as the film chugs along. Not that Bill Murray isn’t funny in this role. There are some very funny bits in that deadpan, world weary way only he can pull off. It’s just that the laughter is tempered with some dramatic moments that keep it from being typical curmudgeon comedy.

The Sapphires

In a nutshell, The Sapphires is like an indie version of Sparkle meets Dreamgirls. It’s based on the true story of an aboriginal singing group that was basically Australia’s answer to The Supremes during the late 1960s. And while the story itself is interesting, the performances solid, and the music engaging, the film suffers from an extremely muddy narrative. It’s all over the place. That said, if you’re a fan of soul music and Motown, it’s definitely worth checking out – if not immediately, then down the road as a rental. Here’s the gist:

Bridesmaids

Bridesmaids really is like The Hangover with chicks. And like The Hangover, this smart adult comedy should appeal to both sexes because, well, it’s pretty darn funny – even when it’s gross.